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The Kundakala Project

Studies indicate that the benefits of female economic empowerment are immense both to women and to society. At an individual level, a woman in work not only reaps the financial benefits of paid employment but also becomes more confident and independent. Her self-esteem rises and she becomes a good role model for her children, especially her daughters. At a wider societal level, this UN Women’s report highlights some key benefits of female economic empowerment, citing amongst other things that “when more women work, economies grow”. 

This growth and economic empowerment is the prime objective of the Kundakala Project.

 

How we do it

Kundakala runs tailoring workshops in Belgaum, India and in London to unemployed women equipping them with the skills needed to make Kundakala products.

The workshops are run by professional tailors and at the end of the programme, participants are taught to make our products like aprons, cushion covers, tea towels and scarves.

The women are also given subsequent guidance on starting their own tailoring business from home and if the products they make during the workshops pass quality control, Kundakala becomes their first client. 

A Kundakala participant below speaks about her journey.

Why we do it

Throughout the world, women’s unemployment remains a core societal issue. It shows up particularly starkly in the two countries where Kundakala is deeply involved.

In India, data from the World Bank illustrates that although women’s employment has always been low to begin with, it has dropped by nearly 11% in the last fifteen years. This indicates that there are millions of women who are out of the workforce and unable to work for a variety of reasons.

In the UK, data published by the Office of National Statistics states that the unemployment rate in women is 4%. Statistics by the British government note that this rate doubles to 8.1% for women who are classed as British Asian Minority Ethnic and are from Asian, African, and non-white groups. 

In both India and within the ethnic minorities in the UK, the barriers to good, decent paid work are very similar. These tend to be cultural and societal: the lack of skills, education and confidence, and an inability to integrate into the wider community.

The Kundakala Project seeks to help women overcome these barriers and give them a chance to secure decent paid work on their own terms.

 

 

Get in Touch. Get Involved.

You can help us by in three ways: Donate cash to help acquire printed material, tailoring professionals and workshop venues; you can donate old sewing machines; or you can help donate your time to market our products and to fundraise for us. 

Need Help? Chat with us